Mother of all Linen sectionals

#65
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
9,450
Location
San Francisco, CA
Credits
433
He still needs to clean it the right way to avoid water rings and potentially rusting buttons.
Lots of repetitious detail work.

Jimmy would have cleaned that entire goodfellas contraption in 30 minutes, top.

And please try to refrain from derailing this fine thread, Jim :icon_rolleyes:
 
#68
Joined
Oct 7, 2006
Messages
2,931
Location
IL
Credits
141
DAMN IT ALL TO HELL RICO!
DON'T MAKE ME DRIVE ALL FREAKING NIGHT TO VISIT YOU WITH A BASEBALL BAT!

Richard lives on like a 5000 acre farm with a driveway so long normal cars/truck cant even get up to the house. If you did get close to the house his stable of wild thoroughbreds would stomp your head. I'm sure his hundreds of servants would stop you somehow.

Sorry Jim, the guy poops dollar bills.
 
#74
Joined
Oct 10, 2006
Messages
2,916
Location
Ann Arbor
Credits
225
Steve Lawrence said: ↑
John, how do you know this isn't linen?
Because Goomer posted a photo of the info about the fabric.
Steve, if you don't mind, let everyone know how long you've been cleaning upholstery.

I don't know if you can know the figure exactly, but taking the years you've been at it, and the amount of upholstery you've likely cleaned each year, that you've probably have cleaned over 5000 pieces.

Does that sound about right?
Hi Jim, I haven't really done the math but I have cleaned a lot of furniture since 1972, not as long as Lee Stockwell, though. Back then there was little to no training available and it was a pretty lonely deal with no internet either. Kids today don't know how good they have it with all the great training and great tools available. Only good thing about the old days was that there was very little competition. :icon_razz:
 
#75
MB Exclusive.
Joined
Oct 7, 2006
Messages
8,035
Credits
388
Hi Jim, I haven't really done the math but I have cleaned a lot of furniture since 1972, not as long as Lee Stockwell, though. Back then there was little to no training available and it was a pretty lonely deal with no internet either. Kids today don't know how good they have it with all the great training and great tools available. Only good thing about the old days was that there was very little competition. :icon_razz:
Thanks for the bow to Lee Stockwell. The collective years of experienc here is incredible. Besides, I don't feel like the oldest guy here :)
 
#77
Joined
Oct 9, 2006
Messages
57,028
Location
BFE
Credits
1,351
BTW, Jim, the first training I ever got was from your Dad in Fresno at Ed York's Steam Services in 1979! My business was a disaster at the time so I took a course from your dad on Disaster Cleanup. :lol:
I took the same course from Lee when he taught it in Phoenix Az around the same time.

We were mostly carpet cleaners but had been asked to some some restoration work. My father sent me to the class. I saw them run a Thermal Fogger and within two weeks we had a school fire and ordered one from Steam Services.

The rest is Rock N Roll history! :winky:
 
Last edited by a moderator:
#81
MB Exclusive.
Joined
Oct 7, 2006
Messages
8,035
Credits
388
I saw Ed York in KC in one of his classes and he told me to shut up. You see I was one of those idiots who asked stupid questions interrupting the class.
Ed York did a lot for our industry, but he also could create realities that existed only in his mind. He didn't like being challenged because some of his marketing ideas were made up the night before the class and were unproven, to say it mildly.

He surrounded himself with technical experts like Jeff Bishop, Ron Toney, and my father. Working with him was sort of like taking a road trip in a car prone to breakdowns with a Tasmanian Devil that was on a crystal meth high in the middle of a tornado...

...only worse.
 
#85
Joined
Feb 9, 2009
Messages
3,382
Location
Bronx, New York
Credits
369
I'm noticing that manufacturers are are misleading the customers with improper names. Such as this piece being called linen or Smart Strand calling one of Thier carpet types "Silk"
The fact that the word "Linen" was used in a designated product name by a manufacturer when in reality it is a acrylic fabric is really irking me.

Not only is the consumer misled, but any information about the product that they pass on to anyone else regarding it, like a cleaning professional, is completely incorrect.

A previous cleaner who told this customer he could/would not be able to clean it, likely under the false impression that it was in fact linen.

I was about to quote a linen rate which is now not applicable.

The customer mentioned a competitor was also actively bidding on the job, so I wonder if he is pricing it as linen or not.

Due to this deliberately misleading information by the manufacturer, this customer is under the false impression that her piece must be cleaned very carefully, utilizing a very expensive cleaning process tailored for delicate linen fabric.

Due to this deliberately misleading information by the manufacturer, this customer is having trouble finding what she believes to be an adequate service provider.

Due to this deliberately misleading information by the manufacturer, this customer may have fallen victim to a less than honest cleaner that knowingly sold her on a high linen rate even though he is aware of the truth.

Bringing her up to speed on this issue is probably not a bad thing for me to do.

I'm not going to give her a linen rate, but she is going to get my premium investigative rate.
 
#87
Joined
Nov 3, 2014
Messages
214
Location
El Dorado Hills California
Credits
0
Ed York did a lot for our industry, but he also could create realities that existed only in his mind. He didn't like being challenged because some of his marketing ideas were made up the night before the class and were unproven, to say it mildly.

He surrounded himself with technical experts like Jeff Bishop, Ron Toney, and my father. Working with him was sort of like taking a road trip in a car prone to breakdowns with a Tasmanian Devil that was on a crystal meth high in the middle of a tornado...

...only worse.
Holy cow Jim that's really funny!!!
 
#88
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
9,450
Location
San Francisco, CA
Credits
433
That sofa, even if it was made from solution dyed certified organic Herculon, personally Tefloned by your choice of favorite Pemberton - would still be a pain to clean and prone to water rings and other misfortunes.

Hope you're fully recovered from your manufacturer deliberately induced disappointment and that your investigative rates are high.

Or you may still-

 
Likes: Lee Stockwell

Latest posts

Top