Which one of those fabric protectors are recommended?

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I'm about ready to stock up on a fresh supply of fabric protectors. I want to try the stuff that you don't need to add water to. Who has the best that you spray 100% so it'll dry faster?
 
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I'm about ready to stock up on a fresh supply of fabric protectors. I want to try the stuff that you don't need to add water to. Who has the best that you spray 100% so it'll dry faster?
I know prochem has a RTU protector out.... Covers 200 Sqft, for 1 gal.( one L/R)???? My cost, 52.00bucks? No thank you.....
 
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When using any protector, use an appropriate respirator, have lots of ventilation and move the customers and pets out of the room. It's not just the solvents, you don't want the active ingredients clogging up your lungs.
 
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I've tried using solvent protectors but it's just too much solvent vapor for my techs and customers to breathe.

I don't think it's a healthy practice.

We do use a solvent protector for furniture but it's a lot less product and we ventilate well.
Is it the same type of smell that new carpet gives when it's off gassing?
 
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@Larry Cobb the smell of the Ultraseal can get annoying. Is there a way to add a fragrance to it to offset the solvent smell?
I actually like the smell of Cobb's protector... Too bad shipping is expensive to us... I'm curious how much a 55 gallon drum costs.....? Aiea, Hawaii 96701

@Larry Cobb
 
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When using any protector, use an appropriate respirator, have lots of ventilation and move the customers and pets out of the room. It's not just the solvents, you don't want the active ingredients clogging up your lungs.
You're right about protection. If I am not mistaken, Teflon etc. (Fluoro chemicals) are pretty inert (non reactive), yet you still do not want it coating your lungs.
Any solvent based protectant will leave too much solvent present on the premises, not all of which will evaporate as quickly as one assumes.
 
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We use Prochem's Flourosi II. Its OMS base but smells clean.
It works great we've used it for many years. We sprayed several thousands of dollars of it for one commercial client.

However lke all solvents you need to take precautions if spraying a lot pieces with it.

Good ventilation, PPE for you, client out of the area, don't put back in service until cured.
 
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There's 2 more protectors out there that make me curious: Harvard's and Masterblend's. Maybe @Mark Saiger can enlighten us on Harvard's and is there anyone that's used Masterblend's?
I've only used MasterBlend's Ultimate Solvent Protector on 3 silk rugs... Smell isn't very strong as we had to spray it on location due to the timing of the confirmation... Client home and was able to close off the area we sprayed it in... Performance I'm unsure of, but it does have UV blocker in it also from what I've seen on the bottle...
 
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Can a solvent based protector be sprayed on wet fiber? @Larry Cobb
Jordan;

The Ultraseal solvent protector on it's way to you . . . ,
can be applied to "damp rugs" out of the centrifuge.

It is also not combustible, due to our proprietary blend of solvents.
Some of them actually have a pleasant odor, as Nate noticed.
And they dry faster than "OMS" solvents.

We have several rug cleaners ordering multiple drums for their "premium protection",
compared to "brand name" water-based fluorochemicals.

The fluorochemical has enough affinity for the fiber,
that it will attach to fiber even in the presence of moisture.
 
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There are functionally only two protectors on the market: those that use silicone as a water blocker; those that use a fluoropolymer as a water and oil blocker. Not being a tent maker, I'll skip the silicones.

The differences then come down to the solvent chosen as a carrier (most use OMS) and the amount of solids (fluoropolymer) in the mix. Larry using other solvents may make a faster drying product or reduce odor, at the expense of possibly being a little more expensive.

Be aware that a high solid percentage isn't better if misused. For example, a "bulletproof" product might work great for outdoor fabric and might make anything else feel stiff.
 
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There are functionally only two protectors on the market: those that use silicone as a water blocker; those that use a fluoropolymer as a water and oil blocker.

The differences then come down to the solvent chosen as a carrier (most use OMS) and the amount of solids (fluoropolymer) in the mix. Larry using other solvents may make a faster drying product or reduce odor, at the expense of possibly being a little more expensive.

Be aware that a high solid percentage isn't better if misused. For example, a "bulletproof" product might work great for outdoor fabric and might make anything else feel stiff.
There are about 8 fluorochemical types to choose from today .

We think we have chosen the most effective type of product for Oil and Water repellency.

Solvent-based fluorochemicals don't leave the stiff hand that water-based products are known for.
 
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I've tried using solvent protectors but it's just too much solvent vapor for my techs and customers to breathe.

I don't think it's a healthy practice.

We do use a solvent protector for furniture but it's a lot less product and we ventilate well.
In this day and age of chemical phobia, its a wise idea.

People crack me up. They will be worried about Encap particles but are willing to spray chemicals and have vapor for their clients to breathe.
 
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No, you are missing the point. While I do have concerns about out tech applying product. He can easily be protected with a full face respirator and organic vapor cartridge.

Its the client that I am concerned about, and not necessarily the exposure but the perception I am using products that could be hazardous to them or their family.

Even more is the possibility of issues, real or imagined related to the products we used or exposed them to.

We have pollution insurance but deductibles are expensive. We manage risk by using as little solvents in the home as necessary to be effective. No fogging, spraying or large concentration without ventilation and the occupants being out of the area.
 
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@Larry Cobb the smell of the Ultraseal can get annoying. Is there a way to add a fragrance to it to offset the solvent smell?
Charlie;
We do have a new solvent that actually smells quite good.

We have added it to our POG formulation with good feedback.

It can be added to the Ultraseal.

Let me know on your next order, and you can try it.
 
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I understand the political concern about a solvent odor. Easily handled by asking the customer if it will bother them.

The concern about inhaling protectant or carrier is a sign of proper concern for tech and customer. It is a valid concern if you're going to be spraying above your head, but not if you're applying the product correctly. "Drift" is quite small if you use low pressure and a large jet, even better if the jet puts the product close to the textile. We've had to test this at the direction of the Seattle Fire Department. The verdict from the industrial hygienist: No fire issue, no health issue. Respirators not required.
 

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