How much carpet protector do you sell and what's your best pitch?

#4
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One of our techs was calling it stain protector as his old boss did and is selling 50%. I told him he had to explain and clarify that and it is still working.Learn something new every day.
 
#6
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While I was working I would grab Mrs Piff's attention while I cleaned the main traffic lane in a living room. Something something about I love what I do because our process continually surprises me(as I'm making the traffic lane disappear before her eyes). Protector would benefit you greatly in your main walk ways and can improve vacuuming efficiency and help the carpet to last up to 50% longer than it's normal lifespan. For the living room only it would be $xx.xx, but if you'd like the other areas done as well it would be $xxx.xx .

That did a few things. 1) Instilled our cleaning process was great to help provide value and she could see improvement before her eyes. 2) Reiterated the importance of vacuuming so hopefully she maintains it and I don't have to work my butt off to get it clean next time. 3) Instead of just giving one option I gave her two and usually would price it as the living room being full price(we charged a per room price for protector), and then a 10% break on the other areas(usually bedrooms). Most of these women are educated and could do simple math to see they're saving. Or I'd flat out tell them what they're saving because Kohls makes billions from women using that approach.
 
#7
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In the shop, the desk crew mentions it. No signage, no killer closing lines. If a customer asks them what good it is, they might say the product provides more time to blot up a spill themselves, makes things they couldn't get out easier for us to remove and keeps the carpet looking clean longer.
They sell protectant on 68% of orders.

The on-location tech's average is between 25 and 35%, just because they get lazy about asking. The techs that ask on every job are over 50%.



PS: A cleaning company owner told me he's solved the "I forgot to ask" problem by getting a rubber stamp made that had a square outline. Inside the outline it said, "Did you ask about Scotchgard" and had a check box for 'YES' and 'NO' and an initial line. He stamps every work order in red. Asking brought the average from 10% to over 50%.
 
#8
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My question is this.

Does our cleaning process, whatever that may be, remove the existing, original protectant that is applied to the fibers by the manufacturer? I don't necessarily think it does unless the cleaning system is very aggressive with mechanical scrubbing. After carpet is a few years old, foot traffic has abraded the fibers enough to remove some, if not all of the original protectant. So when we clean the carpet, it may not look as good when we are done as it did a year ago. That is because of abrasion to the fibers from for traffic for another year.

Lightly traveled parts of the carpet will not need the protector as far as I see it, just the traffic lanes. This will reduce the charge to the customer since we are not treating every square foot of exposed carpet, only the traffic lanes.

Does this sound like a fair plan for both of us? I want to be fair to my customer and explain why they need some protectant, just not on all of the carpet that we just cleaned.
 
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#10
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Scruz needs to up their game..
are they "believers" in it?
do they get a prime cut on the sale or a measly little tiny chihuahua size Milk Bone?



How much carpet protector do you sell and what's your best pitch?.
Little to none on carpet, Big Slim
Just had a ethics problem trying sell snake oil to working folks with poly and olie carpets
and 93.7763% of the others that would get no real benefit from it .
Upl is the only place I suggested/recommended to those that could/would benefit

..L.T.A.
 
#11
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Lightly traveled parts of the carpet will not need the protector as far as I see it, just the traffic lanes. This will reduce the charge to the customer since we are not treating every square foot of exposed carpet, only the traffic lanes.
Does this sound like a fair plan for both of us? I want to be fair to my customer and explain why they need some protectant, just not on all of the carpet that we just cleaned.
Makes sense. We might also suggest treating areas that may see a lot of spills.
 
#13
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I used to wear those scotchgard buttons . Seemed to work but I got away from using them .................again.

Because I just don't believe in it. People think they can spill anything and the next time you clean they say WTF?
Why doesn't it come out?
Yeah

I'm with Jimmy

I sold on most jobs 30 yeats ago.

I don't see the benefit for the outlay.
 
#17
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When asked I used to tell people, "Well, it isn't like a sheet of plastic that will make a spill float to the door and wait to be let out, but it does give you a better chance getting something out before it gets to be a permanent stain." What a customer gets for their money lies entirely between what you charge and what you've led them to expect.

The ability of a fluorochemical to resist staining on all types of fibers is off-topic, but isn't debatable. It works and has been scientifically proven to work - no belief systems involved. Consider that mills don't apply it to all types of plastic carpet just to add extra cost to their products. Wool carpet producers even apply it and say they don't; they want their product to perform better while pretending protectant is needed.
 
#18
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If they mention it, I ask them if they really feel like they need one more chemical in their home environment.
I don't sell much :winky:

I push it only where I know it is really effective which is natural fabric upholstery and some wool carpet. However, with wool carpeting it creates an issue of how long it takes to dry (particularly with thick wool) which in SF is already an issue. And I sure ain't going to introduce a few gallons of solvent into their home. That's unethical.
 
#21
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I mention it on every job I can.
No real selling other than ask if they would like fabric protector for their stairway, traffic lanes, rugs and upholstery.
I believe in it. I don't think of it as stain protection; more as general protection from everything. Like waxing the car.
If it's nylon then it's going to help with stain protection.
Even if I was using Scotch Guard I would still call it Fabric Protector because I don't use products they can buy where they shop.
It makes a dramatic difference to job totals.
 
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If your customer has ever had their carpets cleaned by Stanley, Coit or any of the big franchises, they have already heard a pitch about protection. The works been done for you, all you have to do is ask.
 
#30
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And I sure ain't going to introduce a few gallons of solvent into their home. That's unethical.
Nit #1- When there are water based products, why use a solvent based product at all?
Nit #2- Gallons of solvent? Now I understand your ethical concern. Read the directions, Bub.
 

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