Advice needed about treated wood

#1
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Not about carpet but maybe some here know:
  1. Can you bury treated wood to border a gravel path?
  2. Is there any kind of coating that makes it last longer?
  3. What thickness is advisable?
  4. Any idea how long can the board last in the ground?
We've looked at some plastic border products but the feedback (even for the real thick ones) is that you can't keep them straight and as time passes and exposure to sun, they conform to the pressure from the gravel.

Thank you.
 
#2
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You can buy 4x4 pressure treated lumber from most hardware stores. They also have pressure treated boards if you are looking for something a little thinner. Everything will eventually rot but these will last a long time. Spend a little more and get pressure treated cedar.
 
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#4
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Ofer, since the eco-dinks got CCA treated lumber banned, pressure treated wood is garbage.
However, if you seek out wood from an old deck, you may still fond good CCA wood. Or you can seek out “Marine Grade” which is at 30-45% concentration.

Your last resorts are redwood (pick close grain and for color) or micronized copper. In my opinion, “yellawood” and other ACQ brands) are rip offs.
 
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You have ground contact treatment and below ground treatment, you will want the below ground for flower bed. Ground contact is for like a sill plate of a wall sitting on concrete. They are so saturated when you initially buy them that you can't seal them for month.
 
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Not about carpet but maybe some here know:
  1. Can you bury treated wood to border a gravel path?
  2. Is there any kind of coating that makes it last longer?
  3. What thickness is advisable?
  4. Any idea how long can the board last in the ground?
We've looked at some plastic border products but the feedback (even for the real thick ones) is that you can't keep them straight and as time passes and exposure to sun, they conform to the pressure from the gravel.

Thank you.
As long as the soil drains well the pressure treated woods won't rot.
 
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You may be able to get better redwood or cedar in California, but 30 years ago a company that sold only that lumber told me that the fast-grown trees cut today have relatively little resin in them and don't last in contact with the ground. They recommended a brand of treated wood that isn't available anymore.

Look for a tag on the end of the lumber that says, UC4. UC4A will probably do, but if the ground is wet a lot you might need UC4B.

Here in the wet winter northwest, a UC4A treated timber will last about 25 years... As long as you seal any cut ends with the appropriate product. Don't seal the ends and you'll find the insects will just hollow the timber out.

PS: creosoted railroad ties are not illegal (they're sold at Home Depot) for landscaping or retaining walls. They're just not appropriate around a garden used for growing food. They're creosoted cedar and will last 75 years or more.
 
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Don't use concrete to set posts.
he's lining a gravel drive, Steveo


posts go on piers or footings
and you can certainly concrete them.
I don't believe concrete causes them to rot prematurely .
More likely the top of post hole wasn't graded right and water pools around the post with every rain.
Put more dirt (or concrete) around it so the grade is away from post and doesn't become an 8"-12" diameter bird bath with every little shower

..L.T.A.
 
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#27
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he's lining a gravel drive, Steveo


posts go on piers or footings
and you can certainly concrete them.
I don't believe concrete causes them to rot prematurely .
More likely the top of post hole wasn't graded right and water pools around the post with every rain.
Put more dirt (or concrete) around it so the grade is away from post and doesn't become an 8"-12" diameter bird bath with every little shower

..L.T.A.
I agree with the trapping of water due to improper concrete setting but the fence I built 20 years ago is still standing with not one rotted post.

The vinyl fence I'm building now is concrete in bobs way cept I level and plumb everything before dumping the bag of concrete in.

I have been told there is something in some concrete mixes that isn't good for wood.
 
#29
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I have been told there is something in some concrete mixes that isn't good for wood.


donno about that, Steveo

fast set Quickcrete is generally what's suggested for the dry bag and water pour method




It persuaded me to go with the ultimate wood product - bricks.
I was going to suggest stone if you wanted a "forever" product
bricks can and do shift though over the years

did you ever get any contractors to call you back?
Might be worth your while to get a pro landscaper to look at the specifics of your particular piece of WhoopChuck world to offer suggestions and guidance

..L.T.A.
 
#30
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Last time I got
....suggestions and guidance
..L.T.A.
It did not lead to the hoped for nirvana.


Hell no I am not going to call a contractor that does not even bother to follow through. I'll do it myself.
It may be ugly. It may be a chore. But it sure will be a lot cheaper and I like the satisfaction of doing it myself (once I am done) and it will be my ugly :very_drunk:

and Whooooooooop Chuck is OH specific :winky:

It's hard to find uniform (more or less) stones. I will dig and set bricks a few inches in. So hopefully not too much movement.
 

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