Advice needed about treated wood

Discussion in 'the Bird Room' started by ruff, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. ruff
    ruff

    Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    Messages:
    9,327
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Name:
    Ofer Kolton
    Not about carpet but maybe some here know:
    1. Can you bury treated wood to border a gravel path?
    2. Is there any kind of coating that makes it last longer?
    3. What thickness is advisable?
    4. Any idea how long can the board last in the ground?
    We've looked at some plastic border products but the feedback (even for the real thick ones) is that you can't keep them straight and as time passes and exposure to sun, they conform to the pressure from the gravel.

    Thank you.
  2. Cleanworks
    Cleanworks

    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2012
    Messages:
    8,668
    Location:
    New Westminster,BC
    Name:
    Ron Marriott
    You can buy 4x4 pressure treated lumber from most hardware stores. They also have pressure treated boards if you are looking for something a little thinner. Everything will eventually rot but these will last a long time. Spend a little more and get pressure treated cedar.
    ruff likes this.
  3. Blue-Collar Hero
    Blue-Collar Hero

    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    Messages:
    56,655
    Location:
    Elysium
    Name:
    Rich
    They make ground contact double treated to last longer. It will eventually dry rot but is designed to last longer than standard pressure treated.
    The Great Oz, Matt Wood and ruff like this.
  4. Old Coastie
    Old Coastie

    Supportive Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2015
    Messages:
    5,005
    Location:
    Heart of Dixie
    Name:
    Stephen
    Ofer, since the eco-dinks got CCA treated lumber banned, pressure treated wood is garbage.
    However, if you seek out wood from an old deck, you may still fond good CCA wood. Or you can seek out “Marine Grade” which is at 30-45% concentration.

    Your last resorts are redwood (pick close grain and for color) or micronized copper. In my opinion, “yellawood” and other ACQ brands) are rip offs.
    ruff likes this.
  5. Jimmy L
    Jimmy L

    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    11,039
    Location:
    Ne
    Name:
    Jimmy L
    I would think you can apply some sort of natural color stain that would protect it even better.
    ruff likes this.
  6. Cleanworks
    Cleanworks

    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2012
    Messages:
    8,668
    Location:
    New Westminster,BC
    Name:
    Ron Marriott
    Or something like Thompson's water seal.
    ruff likes this.
  7. Andy
    Andy

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2016
    Messages:
    404
    Location:
    Michigan
    Name:
    Andrew
    You have ground contact treatment and below ground treatment, you will want the below ground for flower bed. Ground contact is for like a sill plate of a wall sitting on concrete. They are so saturated when you initially buy them that you can't seal them for month.
    ruff likes this.
  8. JohnHawkP
    JohnHawkP

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    109
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Name:
    John Paton
    Wood in contact with the ground usually leads to rot.

    Paint on creosote which is effective against rot and buy wood that can be used in contact with the soil.
    ruff likes this.
  9. bob vawter
    bob vawter

    Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    35,496
    Location:
    La La Land
    Name:
    bob vawter
    Never build something better
    Than the length of time yor gonna live.....
    Ohh ya and don stand down wind if you ever burn it
    Jimmy L and Cleanworks like this.
  10. Old Coastie
    Old Coastie

    Supportive Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2015
    Messages:
    5,005
    Location:
    Heart of Dixie
    Name:
    Stephen
    Another option is illegal. Dig your footing trenches and when you are satisfied, spray copper napthanate down the length of them. Be generous. Soak ‘em!

    I’d do it.
    ruff likes this.
  11. Sierra Clean Care
    Sierra Clean Care

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Messages:
    1,701
    Location:
    Bc
    Name:
    Jeff T
    Use a good quality pressure treated cedar, and whatever is below grade, get some tar, and paint it on.
    ruff and bob vawter like this.
  12. sOOper hero
    sOOper hero

    Number 5

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    18,884
    Location:
    North East Ohio
    Name:
    Larry Capitoni
    ruff likes this.
  13. steve_64
    steve_64

    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2012
    Messages:
    7,265
    As long as the soil drains well the pressure treated woods won't rot.
  14. Mikey P
    Mikey P

    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2006
    Messages:
    72,318
    Location:
    The High Chapperal
    Name:
    Mike Pay-oh-tay
    What do you got against plastic?
  15. sOOper hero
    sOOper hero

    Number 5

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    18,884
    Location:
    North East Ohio
    Name:
    Larry Capitoni

    Try an' keep up, SlapStick

    "We've looked at some plastic border products but the feedback (even for the real thick ones) is that you can't keep them straight and as time passes and exposure to sun, they conform to the pressure from the gravel."


    ..L.T.A.
    ruff likes this.
  16. bob vawter
    bob vawter

    Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    35,496
    Location:
    La La Land
    Name:
    bob vawter
    don worry guys
    i'll let everyone know....
    sOOper hero likes this.
  17. The Great Oz
    The Great Oz

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    3,670
    Location:
    seattle
    Name:
    bryan
    You may be able to get better redwood or cedar in California, but 30 years ago a company that sold only that lumber told me that the fast-grown trees cut today have relatively little resin in them and don't last in contact with the ground. They recommended a brand of treated wood that isn't available anymore.

    Look for a tag on the end of the lumber that says, UC4. UC4A will probably do, but if the ground is wet a lot you might need UC4B.

    Here in the wet winter northwest, a UC4A treated timber will last about 25 years... As long as you seal any cut ends with the appropriate product. Don't seal the ends and you'll find the insects will just hollow the timber out.

    PS: creosoted railroad ties are not illegal (they're sold at Home Depot) for landscaping or retaining walls. They're just not appropriate around a garden used for growing food. They're creosoted cedar and will last 75 years or more.
    ruff likes this.
  18. ruff
    ruff

    Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    Messages:
    9,327
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Name:
    Ofer Kolton
    They don't keep straight.
    They expand in the sun and deteriorate fast.
    With time they bend, if there's pressure from gravel on them.
    They down right ugly.

    Other than that, there's nothing wrong with them.
  19. Small town janitorial
    Small town janitorial

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2017
    Messages:
    295
    Location:
    California
    Name:
    Matt Ross
    Find some railroad ties and be done with it. They last forever and a have a neat look imo.
  20. Small town janitorial
    Small town janitorial

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2017
    Messages:
    295
    Location:
    California
    Name:
    Matt Ross
    Find some railroad ties and be done with it. They last forever and a have a neat look imo.

Share This Page